Assembling Course Source Materials

This library guide was originally created to accompany the session, "Deep Linking for Deep Learning: Source Materials Simplified for Courses & TFs," at the Bok Center Fall Teaching Conference 2006. It is maintained at this address for continuing use by TFs.


Finding, Identifying, and Purchasing Materials

HOLLIS: To find books for your course, use the HOLLIS or HOLLIS Classic catalog.

Do a title or author search: human rights and human welfare

If a digital copy of the book is available, the words "Networked Resource" will display in the record. Additionally, a button labeled "online" will appear in the HOLLIS record, or the words "Internet Link" will display in HOLLIS Classic. Make a copy of the internet link for later use; it will usually look something like this:

http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.ejournals:sfx991042727021546

or this:

http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:hul.ebookbatch.SPRGR_batch:9781461406150

If a digital copy is not available, ask the appropriate library to put a print copy on reserve for the course.

Citation Linker: If you have a list of article readings in hand, use Citation Linker to find out if Harvard owns the journal and if it's in digital format.

Start with an article citation:

Peters, Anne, et al. "Trade-offs between immune investment and sexual signaling in male mallards," American Naturalist, vol. 164(1), July 2004: 51-59.

a. Go to the Citation Linker and plug in as much information as you can about the journal and / or article, then click the Find It button.

b. If Harvard does own the journal in digital format, clicking that button will take you to a message telling you where to locate the digital article (with a link that takes you there).

1. Go to the digital format of the article and find the appropriate stable or persistent deep link. Deep links should have "ezp" or "nrs" near the start of the URL so that our proxy server is used for authentication. For example: http://ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=22530987&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

2. Copy the deep-link and paste it beneath the article citation in your reading list. (For more help on recognizing and making deep-links, please see Linking to Harvard Library E-Resources.)

c. If Harvard doesn't own the journal in digital format, clicking that button will take you to a message telling you to check the HOLLIS catalog. Most of the time it will provide a clickable link that automatically does the search for the journal in HOLLIS. At that point you can request the appropriate library to put copies on reserve or make copies yourself to put on reserve for the course.

E-Resources: If you want to find articles in a subject area on a particular topic or by a particular author, use the Harvard Libraries web site to search electronic resources. In addition to the instructions below, you may find the "Finding E-Resources by Subject and Keyword" tutorial helpful.

a. Go to the main Harvard Libraries page.

b. Underneath the "Articles and more" header, click on "Find e-Resources."

c. At the Find e-Resources page, click the Subject tab on the screen.

d. Scan the list of subjects in the box at screen left, and select one you want to find articles in.

e. Once you've selected a subject from the left-hand box, select "Indexes to journal articles, etc." in the right-hand box, then click the Go button.

f. You will get a list of electronic journal indexes with links directly into the indexes. Click the link for an index you want to search and follow the directions given to locate articles on a particular topic or by a particular author.

g. After you do a search you will get a list of articles on your topic/by your author with the Find It button in the citation. Just click that button to see if Harvard owns the journal exactly as in the Citation Linker instructions above. Again, once you locate an electronic copy of an article, consult the Linking to Harvard Library E-Resources guide for instructions on making links directly into the full-text using Microsoft Word.

Librarians: Librarians can help you identify special collections materials that may be relevant to your course. To speak with a librarian about this, contact your academic department's Library Lisiaons and Research Contacts.

Purchasing New Library Materials: Harvard Library’s collections support scholarship and teaching across the University’s broad range of academic programs. To sustain this level of support, collection development librarians regularly purchase new materials, often considering suggestions from members of the Harvard Community.

Harvard Library bibliographers, library liaisons, curators, and other collection development librarians are available to discuss information needs and potential acquisitions with faculty and students, including special purchases for course reserves. For a contact list, please see Collection Development Librarians by Subjects and Regions, or submit your Purchase Request online. For additional information, please contact Dan Hazen, the associate librarian of Harvard College for collection development, at 617-495-0677.

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Preparing Materials for Consultation by Students

Creating Deep Links to Full Text: If you've used Citation Linker or the Find It button in an e-Research resource, you now have the deep-link to use in making the connection directly to the full-text for your students.

At this point connect the link within a Microsoft Word document by doing the following:

1. Begin with a citation in the Word document:

Poisbleau, Maud, et al. "Linear social dominance hierarchy and corticosterone responses in male mallards and pintails," Hormones and Behavior, vol. 47(4), April 2005: 485-492.

2. Find or construct the deep-link, using the Linking to Harvard Library E-Resources guide; in this case the article has a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), so the persistent link is:
http://ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2005.01.001?nosfx=y

3. In your Word document, highlight the article citation, then Insert a hyperlink. The Insert Hyperlink window opens, with an Address box.

4. Copy the deep-link and paste it into the Address box.

5. At this point the citation will become a hyperlink; click on it to get to the full-text:

Poisbleau, Maud, et al. "Linear social dominance hierarchy and corticosterone responses in male mallards and pintails," Hormones and Behavior, vol. 47(4), April 2005: 485-492.

Digitizing Course Materials: The Harvard College Library Collections Digitization Program (CDP) focuses on building digital collections of enduring value drawn from materials in the Harvard College Library. The program supports projects that:

  • demonstrate a significant added value to collections through reformatting;
  • have an identifiable academic constituency;
  • comply with copyright and intellectual property law and University policies;
  • provide university-wide access, and broader access whenever possible.

For more information, see the HCL Collections Digitization Program page.

Reserves: To put copies of required texts on reserve at the appropriate library, go into your course site and use the Reserves Reading List tool. There are detailed instructions and links for further help at the Course Reserves for Faculty and Instructors page on the HCL web site.

Here are some quick links from that page:

Participating Libraries and Reserves Staff Contact Information

Library Reserves Submission Deadlines

Reserves Tool Quick Reference Guide for FAS Faculty and Course Staff

Which method is better, course reserves or deep linking? You may well use both deep-linking and library reserves as you assemble course materials. Considerations about the two systems include:

1. The obvious advantage to having the library put materials on reserve for your course is that you submit your list to the library and they do the processing. The trade-offs are you have to plan well in advance to be sure this material is available when your students need it, and it can take some time to add new readings "spontaneously."

2. The advantage to using deep-links to full-text off the course syllabus or reading list from the course site is that you have plenty of control over the process, and can know immediately if an article is available for deep-linking--which is extremely useful if you would like to reduce the size (and cost) of a coursepack or sourcebook. It can also be extremely fast and easy to add readings to your reading list. Consider this if you have any difficulty meeting deadlines for the printed materials. The trade-off is that you are doing the work of locating materials using Citation Linker.

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Presenting Materials in Course Pages

Course iSites: For an online introduction and tour of Course iSites, click here.

The Course iSites Help Center provides detailed online help in using your course site. You'll need to log-in with your Harvard ID and PIN.

You can make links to your electronic readings in a variety of ways in Course iSites, using the Web Links, Text Area, or Course Document tool. For more information please consult the documentation for each of these tools in the Topic Boxes section of the Course iSite online help.

Research Guides: Research guides created by HCL librarians cluster disparate but related resources on a topic in one convenient location and provide detailed advice on how to use the libraries to conduct research for a given class or academic discipline. Librarians will collaborate with instructors to build customized, course-specific guides that can be inserted into course iSites. For a complete listing of existing guides, visit HCL Research Guides. The guides are also accessible via the E-Research site. To speak with a librarian about creating a new research guide, see Library Liaisons and Research Contacts.

Reserves: Materials on course reserve show up on the course page in iSites. To put copies of required texts on reserve at the appropriate library, go into your course site and use the Reserves Reading List tool. There are detailed instructions and links for further help at the Course Reserves for Faculty and Instructors page on the HCL web site.

Here are some quick links from that page:

Participating Libraries and Reserves Staff Contact Information

Library Reserves Submission Deadlines

Reserves Tool Quick Reference Guide for FAS Faculty and Course Staff

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Page Last Reviewed: August 10, 2012