Cabot Library

Past Exhibitions

Tracy Spadafora’s DNA Series
September 19 - December 16, 2013
Exhibition of one of Massachusetts’ best known encaustic artists includes her new work, DNA Series, inspired by the visual and symbolic associations of DNA sequencing.

Secondary Colors: A Collaborative Book
January 28, - May 18, 2013
Twenty-one members of the Delaware Valley Chapter of the Guild of Book Workers participated in this collaborative book project. Each member contributed an edition of sections, exchanged them with other members, and then collated them so that the resulting contents of all the books are the same. The members bound their books individually, producing twenty-one unique bindings. The theme was "secondary colors" and participants were encouraged to interpret that in any way they liked, both in their editions and in the binding.

Founded in 1906, the Guild of Book Workers is the only national organization for all of the arts of the book, including bookbinding, conservation, printing, papermaking, calligraphy, marbling and artist's books. The Guild currently has 850 members, both professional and amateur, from all over the country. The ten regional chapters organize lectures, workshops and exhibitions for our members - this exhibit was organized by the Delaware Valley Chapter but also includes members of the New England Chapter. See the Secondary Colors website for details and images.

The History of Science and Discovery at the Harvard Mineralogical and Geological Museum
October 22 – December 20, 2012
The exhibit consists of minerals, rocks and scientific instruments that trace the history of the HMGM over 200 hundred years through the lens of the curators. Having begun with only a small assemblage of curiosities and teaching specimens, the more than 300,000 specimens the museum currently holds in the four major collections are the result of the scientific and teaching commitment of each curator. From the acquisition of the first meteorite in 1807, to the research on uranium for the Defense Department in the 1950's, and to the donation of the "Flor de Lise" in 2001, the collection has expanded to facilitate the advancement of science and technology, educate the general public through exhibits, and impact the way we understand and utilize our natural world.

The Semitic Museum: From the Nile to the Euphrates
February 7 - August 10, 2012
The Semitic Museum curates and exhibits artifacts garnered from the broad geographic region encompassing the countries of the Middle East. The exhibit represents both the current museum displays and parts of its collection regularly studied by students and scholars of the ancient world.

'Blasted with Excess of Light': the Effects of Light Pollution on the Natural World
October 2010 – January 2011
The widespread use of electric light in the last century has led to profound changes in human and animal experience. This exhibit traces the development and use of electricity and the consequences that result when we never have to be in the dark.

Birds Do It, Bees Do It, Even Roaming Caribou Do It: Migration in the Animal Kingdom
October - January 2009
As children we learn that birds fly south for the winter, but few of us realize the scope and variety of migratory behaviors in animals. This exhibit will look at the migration of mammals, birds, and insects, with an emphasis on how human behavior and activity impacts the movement of animals through the environment.

Rethinking the Darwinian Revolution
February – May 2009
The Cabot Library opened its exhibition space to the students from Professor Janet Browne's history of science class to explore the Darwinian revolution and why Darwin still carries such a punch today.

Birds Do It, Bees Do It, Even Roaming Caribou Do It: Migration in the Animal Kingdom
October - January 2009
As children we learn that birds fly south for the winter, but few of us realize the scope and variety of migratory behaviors in animals. This exhibit will look at the migration of mammals, birds, and insects, with an emphasis on how human behavior and activity impacts the movement of animals through the environment.

Sublime Spectacle: Exploration and Geology in the Grand Canyon
July – October 2008
While it can be appreciated solely for its natural beauty, the Grand Canyon is also one of the best places on earth to see a record of the earth’s geological past. This exhibition showed what the canyon consists of and how it was formed, and also discussed the exploration of the canyon by scientists in the 19th century. Clarence Dutton’s 1882 Atlas to Accompany the Tertiary History of the Grand Cañon District, one of the most beautiful works on the canyon, was displayed.