From the Collections of Harvard College Library, Events and Exhibitions 2014

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John Knowles Paine: Attainment and Legacy
The Loeb Music Library’s latest exhibit examines the career of composer, educator, and Harvard’s first professor of music, John Knowles Paine (1839-1906). Born in Maine to a musical family, Paine developed an early proficiency on the organ and piano, broadened his musical knowledge with composition studies in Germany (where he met and played for Clara Schumann, among other musical luminaries), and returned to settle in Boston, becoming University organist and choirmaster at Harvard’s Appleton Chapel in 1862. Paine was appointed full professor in 1875, by which time he had instituted a curriculum for the study of music which became the model for liberal arts institutions throughout the country. In the course of a long career, he trained a large group of future composers, critics, and music lovers, became the first American-born composer to achieve fame for large-scale compositions, many of which were heard abroad, and became known as the dean of American composers. The exhibit displays scores of many of his large-scale works, as well as several manuscripts of smaller items, traces Paine’s musical development throughout his Harvard years, and documents the reception and influence of his work over the course of a long and fruitful life in music.

Exhibit Area, Second Floor, Loeb Music Library
Hours
For details, please contact Patricia O'Brien at 617-495-2794

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Harvard Library Strategic Conversations are designed to inform the strategic direction of the Library and foster a culture of innovation, entrepreneurship and collaboration among staff, faculty and others in the Library community. It aims to engage the Library Board and Faculty Advisory Council with issues that are facing libraries in general and the Harvard Library in particular in the emerging digital age. Harvard Library Strategic Conversations are funded through the generosity of The Bradley M. and Terrie F. Bloom Family Fund.

Upcoming Events

The Future of the Book
Featuring: James O'Donell, University Professor and Former Provost, Georgetown University & Ellen Faran, Director, MIT Press
Moderated by: Ann Blair, Henry Charles Lea Professor of History, Harvard University

Book history continues to be a thriving area of scholarship, engaging librarians and academics from across the disciplines, including business, history, classics, art and design and, more recently, the digital humanities.

Join us for a discussion that asks "What is the future of the book? How will recent developments in technology and publishing impact scholarship and publishing? Will—or should—the history of the book guide its future?"

The discussion will feature James O'Donnell, university professor and former provost at Georgetown University and author of Avatars of the Word, as well as Ellen Faran, director at mit Press. It will be moderated by Ann Blair, Henry Charles Lea Professor of History at Harvard University, and author of Too Much to Know.

Refreshments will be served.

2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
Location: Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South

How Journal Prices Impede Research Access: A Ted Talk
Join a "fireside" chat between Ted Bergstrom and Peter Suber on the prices of scholarly journals, why prices have grown faster than inflation for decades, how they have limited access to research and prospects for change.

This discussion will feature Ted Bergstrom, professor of economics at UC Santa Barbara and a leading thinker around the economics of scholarly journals. He will be joined by Peter Suber, director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and the Harvard Open Access Project, and author of Open Access.

3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Milstein East C, Wasserstein Hall

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From the Alps to the Ocean: Maps of the Western Front at the Harvard Map Collection
World War One is often described as the first truly modern war, a war where advances in technology had outpaced the tactical thinking of the day. The massive changes that occurred in the field of military technology were mirrored in the field of map mapmaking. New technologies led to new cartographic methods and techniques and to an increased reliance on maps. On the battlefield, cartographers were churning out maps of the trenches almost daily. At home, maps were being used to rally the home front in Europe and to try to convince the United States to join the Entente powers. Immediately after the war, maps were used to help decide how to redefine Europe. At the centennial of the start of the war, this exhibit explores the roles of maps and mapping on the battlefield and at home.

Map Gallery Hall, Pusey Library
Hours
For details, please contact Bonnie Burns at 617-495-2417

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Silhouettes: From Craft to Art
This exhibition explores the production of hand-cut and printed silhouettes in books and manuscript albums from the late 1700s to the present, both as craft and as art forms in Europe and the United States. The 'craze' for silhouettes popularized this figurative genre among a wide audience at the end of the eighteenth-century. Amateurs and professionals alike made silhouettes for private use or widespread circulation. During the nineteenth century, the visual vocabulary of these figures expanded. While remaining a popular art, silhouette-making attracted the interest of artists. The exhibit includes well-known books about or including silhouettes such as those of Johann Caspar Lavater and Kara Walker, as well as lesser known items representative of the subject.

Amy Lowell Room, Houghton Library
Hours
For more information contact Caroline Duroselle-Melish at cmelish@fas.harvard.edu or call 617-495-2444

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Circus, bound by Lester Capon

InsideOUT Contemporary Bindings of Private Press Books
Fifty-nine binders and nine private presses from North America, Canada and Britain have collaborated to form an exhibition which demonstrates the relationship of the binding design to the printed book. Because many of the binders have chosen the same title to work on, it also highlights the differing approaches to the same text. Samples of the texts and illustrations are shown alongside the bindings. The relationship between private presses and bookbinders is longstanding and it is hoped that this extra element to the show will provide the viewer with a more rounded appreciation of the work on display. The curator is Lester Capon, Fellow of Designer Bookbinders, the organization that sponsored the exhibition for which these bindings were created.

An illustrated catalog can be obtained from the Designer Bookbinders Online Shop.

Please join us for an Exhibition Reception on Tuesday, November 4 from 5:30-7:00 p.m.at Houghton Library in the Edison and Newman Room

Edison Newman Room, Houghton Library
Hours
For details, please contact Hope Mayo at 617-495-2444 or mayo@fas.harvard.edu.

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Theodore Roosevelt – "How I Love Sagamore Hill" by Xiomáro
Harvard University's Houghton Library opens the New Year with selections from this photographic series. The New York artist was commissioned by the National Park service to photograph the interiors of the president's "Summer Whitehouse" at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Xiomáro's photographs show the house in a historically rare condition: the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation. The last significant body of interior photographs, albeit fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

Xiomáro's exhibit is timely in that filmmaker Ken Burns, a Harvard graduate, is releasing The Roosevelts, a new PBS documentary that explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt. The exhibit is also unique in that Xiomáro's photographs do not solely focus on TR, but also draw attention to his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household. "Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the imposing character of America's 26th president and the more intimate domestic nature of his family," explained the artist. "Some of these nuances are overwhelmed by a room's furnishings or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers."

Theodore Roosevelt Gallery, Pusey Library
Hours
For details contact Heather Cole at 617-495-2449

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The Woman Working, Jerusalem, Israel, by Hannah Nunez. Let's Go Special Prize for the best photo by a student working for Let's Go.

The Woman Working, Jerusalem, Israel, by Hannah Nunez. Let's Go Special Prize for the best photo by a student working for Let's Go.

Harvard College
Annual International Photo Contest

Photos taken by Harvard students who have studied, worked, interned, or done research abroad during the past year are on exhibit. For more information on the contest, see the photo contest page.


Level B, first and third floor display cases,
Lamont Library (Hours)
For details contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

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1933 Goudey Baseball card no. 118 (Valentine J. (Val) Picinich, Brooklyn Dodgers)
1933 Goudey Baseball card no. 118
(Valentine J. (Val) Picinich, Brooklyn Dodgers)

2014 Philip Hofer Prize for Collecting Books or Art
The Philip Hofer prize is awarded each year to a student at Harvard whose collection of books or works of art best exemplifies the traditions of breadth, coherence, and imagination represented by Philip Hofer, A.B. '21, L.H.D. '67, founder and first Curator of the Department of Printing and Graphic Arts in the Houghton Library and Secretary of the Fogg Art Museum. The prize, which is to encourage student interest in collecting, was established in 1987 by Melvin R. Seiden, A.B. '52, L.L.B. '55. Students competing for the prize submit an annotated list or bibliography and an essay describing the scope, contents, and goal of the collection. On exhibition are samples of this year's first prize winning collection, , A History of the 1933 Goudey Baseball Card Set: From Artwork to Copyright Registration, submitted by Benjamin Lee, Class of 2017.

Third floor display cases, Lamont Library,
Hours
For details, contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

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Keene, Carolyn. The Secret of the Old Clock. 
New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1930. Frontispiece.
– Gift of Charles Sumner, 1860.

Landor, A. Henry Savage. In the Forbidden Land.
Vol. II. New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1899. Illustration facing page 36.

2014 Undergraduate Book Collecting Prize
Established in 1977, the Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting recognizes and encourages book collecting by undergraduates at Harvard. Students competing for the annual prize submit an annotated bibliography and an essay on their collecting efforts, the influence of mentors, the experience of searching for, organizing and caring for items, and the future direction of the collection. On display are samplings of the collections of this year's prize-winning entries, along with personal commentary.


Second and third floor display cases, Lamont Library
Hours
For details, contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

Lectures

Paper history and watermarks research – new perceptions in digital dimensions by Peter Rückert of the Landesarchiv of Baden-Württemberg in Stuttgart

5:30 p.m., Reception in the Edison Newman Room, Houghton Library
Followed by a reception upstairs in the Richardson Room

For details, please contact Monique Duhaime at 617-495-2441 or Duhaime@fas.harvard.edu.

Material aspects of medieval german manuscripts and incunabula (for description and dating) by Peter Rückert of the Landesarchiv of Baden-Württemberg in Stuttgart

10:00 a.m.-Noon and 2:00-4:00 p.m., Houghton Library, Seminar Room

For details, please contact Monique Duhaime at 617-495-2441 or Duhaime@fas.harvard.edu.


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Please join us for the 101st George Parker Winship Lecture

"The Collector's Wisdom and the Dealer's Delight: Bibliographical Understandings and the History of Books"
The traditional business of bibliography has chiefly been tracing histories of error and correction in printed artifacts. With the efflorescence of book history, however, bibliographical scholarship must now embrace a broader remit far beyond foundational work in service of textual editing. In this lecture, Michael Suarez seeks to extend the intellectual mission of object-oriented, bibliographical inquiry in order to develop more capacious understandings of the historical agencies at work in the production of texts.

Michael F. Suarez, S.J. is University Professor and Director of Rare Book School at the University of Virginia, where he leads the Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography. The holder of research fellowships from The American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, he is the 2014–15 J. R. Lyell Reader in Bibliography at Oxford University.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014
5:30 p.m., Lecture in Lamont Library, Forum Room
6:30 p.m., Reception in the Edison Newman Room, Houghton Library

For details, please contact Monique Duhaime at 617-495-2441 or Duhaime@fas.harvard.edu.

Continuing Exhibitions

Mercator Globes
Exhibition includes Gerard Mercator's terrestrial (1541) and celestial (1551) globes that reflect new discoveries in world geography and cosmography as well as new techniques in charting, printing, and globe making. Only 22 matched pairs survive, Harvard's being the only matched pair in America.

Mercator Case, Map Gallery Hall
Hours
For details call the Map Collection at 617-495-2417