From the Collections of Harvard College Library, Events and Exhibitions 2014

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From the Alps to the Ocean: Maps of the Western Front at the Harvard Map Collection
World War One is often described as the first truly modern war, a war where advances in technology had outpaced the tactical thinking of the day. The massive changes that occurred in the field of military technology were mirrored in the field of map mapmaking. New technologies led to new cartographic methods and techniques and to an increased reliance on maps. On the battlefield, cartographers were churning out maps of the trenches almost daily. At home, maps were being used to rally the home front in Europe and to try to convince the United States to join the Entente powers. Immediately after the war, maps were used to help decide how to redefine Europe. At the centennial of the start of the war, this exhibit explores the roles of maps and mapping on the battlefield and at home.

Map Gallery Hall, Pusey Library
Hours
For details, please contact Bonnie Burns at 617-495-2417

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Silhouettes: From Craft to Art
This exhibition explores the production of hand-cut and printed silhouettes in books and manuscript albums from the late 1700s to the present, both as craft and as art forms in Europe and the United States. The 'craze' for silhouettes popularized this figurative genre among a wide audience at the end of the eighteenth-century. Amateurs and professionals alike made silhouettes for private use or widespread circulation. During the nineteenth century, the visual vocabulary of these figures expanded. While remaining a popular art, silhouette-making attracted the interest of artists. The exhibit includes well-known books about or including silhouettes such as those of Johann Caspar Lavater and Kara Walker, as well as lesser known items representative of the subject.

Amy Lowell Room, Houghton Library
Hours
For more information contact Caroline Duroselle-Melish at cmelish@fas.harvard.edu or call 617-495-2444

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Circus, bound by Lester Capon

InsideOUT Contemporary Bindings of Private Press Books
Fifty-nine binders and nine private presses from North America, Canada and Britain have collaborated to form an exhibition which demonstrates the relationship of the binding design to the printed book. Because many of the binders have chosen the same title to work on, it also highlights the differing approaches to the same text. Samples of the texts and illustrations are shown alongside the bindings. The relationship between private presses and bookbinders is longstanding and it is hoped that this extra element to the show will provide the viewer with a more rounded appreciation of the work on display. Curator of the exhibition is Lester Capon, Fellow of Designer Bookbinders, the organization that sponsored the competition for which these bindings were created.

An illustrated catalog can be obtained from the Designer Bookbinders Online Shop.

Edison Newman Room, Houghton Library
Hours
For details, please contact Hope Mayo at 617-495-2444 or mayo@fas.harvard.edu.

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Bow & Arrow Press at Cabot Library
The Bow & Arrow Press is a small letterpress sandwiched into the basement at the Adams House residence hall. We've been active on and off since about 1977, keeping alive the antique technique of hand-setting and hand-printing metal type. As part of our presence on campus, we offer an Open Press Night once a week during the regular semesters, and have attracted a large population of interested folk from all corners of Harvard University. At various times, various people have come to play with various forms of obsolete printing - creating layouts in lead type, copper blocks, wooden type, and linoleum carvings - and printing them on various substrates, from laser bond to handmade paper to wood veneer to T-shirt material. These layouts range from the vernacular to the sublime, from the naïve to the professional. A range of these Open Press projects can be seen here in all their glory. These are only a few of the many things that people have printed at the Press, and there will be many more to come

Main level, exhibit cases,
Cabot Library (Hours)

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Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Typ 11, f.2.

Medieval Scrolls at Harvard
An exhibition of medieval scrolls from Harvard collections, ranging from illuminated luxury chronicles to workaday records, the scrolls illustrate the various ways in which an archaic format continued to be used long into the age of the codex. The exhibition is curated by the sixteen students in Medieval Studies 240/Harvard Divinity School 2228: The Rotulus in the Middle Ages and by Professors Thomas Forrest Kelly and Beverly Mayne Kienzle together with Timothy M. Baker, Harvard Divinity School, and William P. Stoneman, Curator of Early Books & Manuscripts, Houghton Library.

A companion website is available here.

Edison Newman Room, Houghton Library
Hours
For more details please contact Monique Duhaime at 617-495-2441 or at Duhaime@fas.harvard.edu.

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Theodore Roosevelt – "How I Love Sagamore Hill" by Xiomáro
Harvard University's Houghton Library opens the New Year with selections from this photographic series. The New York artist was commissioned by the National Park service to photograph the interiors of the president's "Summer Whitehouse" at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Xiomáro's photographs show the house in a historically rare condition: the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation. The last significant body of interior photographs, albeit fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

Xiomáro's exhibit is timely in that filmmaker Ken Burns, a Harvard graduate, is releasing The Roosevelts, a new PBS documentary that explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt. The exhibit is also unique in that Xiomáro's photographs do not solely focus on TR, but also draw attention to his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household. "Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the imposing character of America's 26th president and the more intimate domestic nature of his family," explained the artist. "Some of these nuances are overwhelmed by a room's furnishings or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers."

Theodore Roosevelt Gallery, Pusey Library
Hours
For details contact Heather Cole at 617-495-2449

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The Woman Working, Jerusalem, Israel, by Hannah Nunez. Let's Go Special Prize for the best photo by a student working for Let's Go.

The Woman Working, Jerusalem, Israel, by Hannah Nunez. Let's Go Special Prize for the best photo by a student working for Let's Go.

Harvard College
Annual International Photo Contest

Photos taken by Harvard students who have studied, worked, interned, or done research abroad during the past year are on exhibit. For more information on the contest, see the photo contest page.


Level B, first and third floor display cases,
Lamont Library (Hours)
For details contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

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1933 Goudey Baseball card no. 118 (Valentine J. (Val) Picinich, Brooklyn Dodgers)
1933 Goudey Baseball card no. 118
(Valentine J. (Val) Picinich, Brooklyn Dodgers)

2014 Philip Hofer Prize for Collecting Books or Art
The Philip Hofer prize is awarded each year to a student at Harvard whose collection of books or works of art best exemplifies the traditions of breadth, coherence, and imagination represented by Philip Hofer, A.B. '21, L.H.D. '67, founder and first Curator of the Department of Printing and Graphic Arts in the Houghton Library and Secretary of the Fogg Art Museum. The prize, which is to encourage student interest in collecting, was established in 1987 by Melvin R. Seiden, A.B. '52, L.L.B. '55. Students competing for the prize submit an annotated list or bibliography and an essay describing the scope, contents, and goal of the collection. On exhibition are samples of this year's first prize winning collection, , A History of the 1933 Goudey Baseball Card Set: From Artwork to Copyright Registration, submitted by Benjamin Lee, Class of 2017.

Third floor display cases, Lamont Library,
Hours
For details, contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

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Keene, Carolyn. The Secret of the Old Clock. 
New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1930. Frontispiece.
– Gift of Charles Sumner, 1860.

Landor, A. Henry Savage. In the Forbidden Land.
Vol. II. New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1899. Illustration facing page 36.

2014 Undergraduate Book Collecting Prize
Established in 1977, the Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting recognizes and encourages book collecting by undergraduates at Harvard. Students competing for the annual prize submit an annotated bibliography and an essay on their collecting efforts, the influence of mentors, the experience of searching for, organizing and caring for items, and the future direction of the collection. On display are samplings of the collections of this year's prize-winning entries, along with personal commentary.


Second and third floor display cases, Lamont Library
Hours
For details, contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

Lectures

There are no lectures scheduled at this time. Please check back for future events.

Continuing Exhibitions

Mercator Globes
Exhibition includes Gerard Mercator's terrestrial (1541) and celestial (1551) globes that reflect new discoveries in world geography and cosmography as well as new techniques in charting, printing, and globe making. Only 22 matched pairs survive, Harvard's being the only matched pair in America.

Mercator Case, Map Gallery Hall
Hours
For details call the Map Collection at 617-495-2417