From the Collections of Harvard College Library, Events and Exhibitions 2009-2010

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"Ethnography and Academic Libraries: Assessment and Design"
Nancy Fried Foster, Senior Anthropologist, Ithaka S+R

Dr. Foster's talk will cover the use of ethnographic methods in qualitative assessment of library services, technologies and facilities, including origin and relevancy of participatory design concepts, how participatory design is different from other approaches, when to use participatory design, what training and resources are required and examples of specific case studies.

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Askwith Hall, Longfellow Hall, Graduate School of Education

 

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"The Tenacious Book: The Curious State of Art and Architecture Collections in a Digital Era"
Vanessa Kam, Acting Head of Music, Art and Architecture, University of British Columbia Library
To research her topic, Vanessa Kam interviewed librarians working in prominent academic and museum libraries in the US and Canada. She also interviewed publishers in the US and Europe about their visions for the future of art publications. Vanessa's findings reveal that while many other disciplines hold massive amounts of digital content, the print format plays a dominant role in art and architecture collections, despite the fact that such collections are evolving.

Vanessa argues that this idiosyncratic development poses challenges and demands special considerations for configuring art library spaces, for devising strategies to transition to an increasingly digital future and for demonstrating the research value of print collections. Her research was supported by the H.W. Wilson Foundation Research Award from the Art Libraries Society of North America.

3:00 p.m.
Room G08, Larsen Hall, Graduate School of Education

 

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"The History of the World Library from the Year 2040 to 2090" Michael Cotta-Schønberg, Deputy Director General, Royal Library in Copenhagen, and University Librarian, University of Copenhagen
Michael Cotta-Schønberg will be speaking NOT on the future of academic libraries, which he says he has done too much, but on the history of the World Library from 2040 to 2090. The presentation will take the form of a speech by the president of the World Library on the occasion of the 50 year jubilee of the Library. The audience will be transformed into members of the board of the World Library and the speech will end with a board vote on whether individuals should be able to have direct brain link-up with the Library.

The time and location of this session will be announced soon.

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Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Typ 11, f.2.

Medieval Scrolls at Harvard
An exhibition of medieval scrolls from Harvard collections, ranging from illuminated luxury chronicles to workaday records, the scrolls illustrate the various ways in which an archaic format continued to be used long into the age of the codex. The exhibition is curated by the sixteen students in Medieval Studies 240/Harvard Divinity School 2228: The Rotulus in the Middle Ages and by Professors Thomas Forrest Kelly and Beverly Mayne Kienzle together with Timothy M. Baker, Harvard Divinity School, and William P. Stoneman, Curator of Early Books & Manuscripts, Houghton Library.

Edison Newman Room, Houghton Library
Hours
Exhibition Opening Reception - Monday, May 5 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. in the Edison and Newman Room
For more details please contact Monique Duhaime at 617-495-2441 or at Duhaime@fas.harvard.edu.

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"An Italian exploratory mission into Africa."
Photo courtesy of Fine Arts Library.

"In Africa it is another story: looking back at Italian colonialism"
Featuring personal albums, photographs, postcards, and maps from the the late nineteenth century to the Fascist period from a rich trove of Harvard Collections, "In Africa it is Another Story: Looking Back at Italian Colonialism" investigates the visual, literary and political imaginary that prepared and accompanied Italy’s belated and violent participation in the colonial "scramble for Africa."

Hosted by Professor Giuliana Minghelli and doctoral candidates Matthew Collins, Dalila Colucci, Eloisa Morra and Chiara Trebbaiocchi.

On exhibit in Pusey Library, April 4 – May 2, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Opening event April 4, 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

This exhibit is free and open to the public. It is located in Pusey Library exhibition space, outside the Harvard Theatre Collection and University Archives. The Pusey Library doors, across from the northeast corner of Widener Library, will be open for the duration of the exhibit.

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Nora E. Barker A map of old Cambridge : formerly Newtowne. 1930.

Courting Clio: Maps and the Historical Imagination
Ever since the revival of classical learning in the Renaissance, Europe's most prominent mapmakers—including Mercator, Ortelius, Janssonius, Sanson, and Delisle—have regarded it as part of their professional duty to apply their craft to an imaginative restoration of the past. Each age has its own peculiar Zeitgeist (yearning for a Golden Age, looking for inspiration in religious saints or secular heroes, or taking satisfaction in the extent of progress from "less enlightened" times), but the urge to court Clio (the muse of history) has been an ongoing theme in cartographic circles. This exhibit explores the ways in which mapmakers frame past events, how they deploy textual and graphic aids in the service of historical narrative, and how they endeavor to convey temporal changes through static images. Whether the subject is the Exodus, the conquests of Alexander the Great, the barbarian invasions of Europe, or the arduous trek of Mormons to the Great Salt Lake, the focus here is on efforts to map our collective peregrinations through time.

Map Gallery Hall, Pusey Library
Hours
For details contact Joseph Garver at 617-496-3670

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Theodore Roosevelt – "How I Love Sagamore Hill" by Xiomáro
Harvard University’s Houghton Library opens the New Year with selections from this photographic series. The New York artist was commissioned by the National Park service to photograph the interiors of the president’s “Summer Whitehouse” at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Xiomáro’s photographs show the house in a historically rare condition: the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation. The last significant body of interior photographs, albeit fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

Xiomáro’s exhibit is timely in that filmmaker Ken Burns, a Harvard graduate, is releasing The Roosevelts, a new PBS documentary that explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt. The exhibit is also unique in that Xiomáro’s photographs do not solely focus on TR, but also draw attention to his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household. “Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the imposing character of America’s 26th president and the more intimate domestic nature of his family,” explained the artist. “Some of these nuances are overwhelmed by a room’s furnishings or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers.”

Theodore Roosevelt Gallery, Pusey Library
Hours
For details contact Heather Cole at 617-495-2449

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The Woman Working, Jerusalem, Israel, by Hannah Nunez. Let's Go Special Prize for the best photo by a student working for Let’s Go.

The Woman Working, Jerusalem, Israel, by Hannah Nunez. Let's Go Special Prize for the best photo by a student working for Let’s Go.

Harvard College
Annual International Photo Contest

Photos taken by Harvard students who have studied, worked, interned, or done research abroad during the past year are on exhibit. For more information on the contest, see the photo contest page.


Level B, first and third floor display cases,
Lamont Library (Hours)
For details contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

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Deutche Bundespost. Olympic Telephone Directory, 1972. Essen: Industriedruck AG Essen, 1972. [In German, French and English].

Deutche Bundespost. Olympic Telephone Directory, 1972.
Essen: Industriedruck AG Essen, 1972. [In German, French and English].

 

2013 Philip Hofer Prize for Collecting Books
or Art

The Philip Hofer prize is awarded each year to a student at Harvard whose collection of books or works of art best exemplifies the traditions of breadth, coherence, and imagination represented by Philip Hofer, A.B. '21, L.H.D. '67, founder and first Curator of the Department of Printing and Graphic Arts in the Houghton Library and Secretary of the Fogg Art Museum. The prize, which is to encourage student interest in collecting, was established in 1987 by Melvin R. Seiden, A.B. '52, L.L.B. '55. Students competing for the prize submit an annotated list or bibliography and an essay describing the scope, contents, and goal of the collection. On exhibition are samples of this year’s first prize winning collection, Between West Germany and the World: Design at the 1972 Munich Olympics.

Third floor display cases, Lamont Library, Hours
For details, contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

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Keene, Carolyn. The Secret of the Old Clock. 
New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1930. Frontispiece.
– Gift of Charles Sumner, 1860.

Keene, Carolyn. The Secret of the Old Clock.
New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1930. Frontispiece.
– Gift of Charles Sumner, 1860.

2013 Undergraduate Book Collecting Prize
Established in 1977, the Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting recognizes and encourages book collecting by undergraduates at Harvard. Students competing for the annual prize submit an annotated bibliography and an essay on their collecting efforts, the influence of mentors, the experience of searching for, organizing and caring for items, and the future direction of the collection. On display are samplings of the collections of this year’s prize-winning entries, along with personal commentary.

Second and third floor display cases, Lamont Library
Hours
For details, contact Lynn Sayers at 617-495-2455

Lectures

There are no Lectures scheduled at this time.

Continuing Exhibitions

Mercator Globes
Exhibition includes Gerard Mercator's terrestrial (1541) and celestial (1551) globes that reflect new discoveries in world geography and cosmography as well as new techniques in charting, printing, and globe making. Only 22 matched pairs survive, Harvard's being the only matched pair in America.

Mercator Case, Map Gallery Hall
Hours
For details call the Map Collection at 617-495-2417