Film Series / Events

Search All Film Series (1999-present)
Browse All Film Series

November 14 - 15, 2003

Global Re-visions: Around the World with Barbara Hammer

The pioneering work of experimental filmmaker Barbara Hammer has long been recognized for its probing and innovative examination of women’s sexuality. While still deeply immersed in questions of lesbian identity, her more recent work has taken this and related concerns around the world in settings as diverse as Japan, Ukraine, and the French Riviera. This program features four recent works from the veteran filmmaker that chart a unique relationship between the personal and the global.

Saturday night’s program is presented as part of the 15th Annual Boston Jewish Film Festival. For advance tickets please visit www.bjff.org.


November 14 (Friday) 7 pm - Director Barbara Hammer in Person

Devotion, A Film about Ogawa Productions

Directed by Barbara Hammer
US/Japan, 2000, b/w and color, 82 min.

In Devotion, Barbara Hammer provides a rare glimpse inside the revolutionary lifestyles and groundbreaking films of members of Ogawa Productions, an important Japanese postwar documentary collective that made significant works about social struggle and village life. Set within the framework of the global student movement of the New Left in the mid 1960s, Devotion presents in-depth stories from collective members, including directors Oshima Nagisa, Hara Kazuo, and Haneda Sumiko. Memory, history, national culture, gender, and identity all figure in the story of the evolution, development, and, finally, disintegration of this seminal film collective.

Browse Other Series from this Season
Return to Top

November 15 (Saturday) 7 pm - Director Barbara Hammer in Person

Resisting Paradise

Directed by Barbara Hammer
US, 2003, color, 80 min.

In 1999, Barbara Hammer spent an artist’s residency in the French fishing village of Cassis, intending to capture the splendor of the Mediterranean light and landscape. When the war in Kosovo broke out, however, her focus shifted dramatically. The result is this film in which Hammer juxtaposes the stories of four French Resistance fighters with the lives of artists Pierre Bonnard and Henri Matisse, who despite the Nazi occupation continued to paint landscapes, portraits, and still lifes in the flattering light of the French Riviera. The film poses the questions: What are our responsibilities during political crises? How can art exist during a time of war?

Browse Other Series from this Season
Return to Top

November 15 (Saturday) 9:30 pm - Director Barbara Hammer in Person

My Babushka: Searching Ukrainian Identities

Directed by Barbara Hammer
US, 2000, color, 53 min.

This story of the personal journey of the filmmaker in search of her ethnic roots, identity, and family history in Ukraine is set against an investigation of civil liberties and cultural difference in a society on the verge of opening itself to the world in the post-glasnost era. Issues of human rights, anti-Semitism, homophobia, and feminism come to the fore as Hammer meets relatives in her grandmother's village, interviews feminist and gay activists, records public ceremonies and ethnic celebrations, and visits Babi Yar, site of the massacre of thousands of Ukrainian Jews. Visually compelling and politically incisive, Hammer’s portrait of a nation becomes a deeply personal and socially revelatory document.

Our Grief Is Not a Cry for War

Directed by Barbara Hammer
US, 2002, color, 3 min.

On October 11, 2001, in Times Square, New York City, an ad hoc group of artists named Our Grief Is Not a Cry for War silently demonstrated for peace at a time when the nation was clamoring for war and sacrificing its own civil liberties. Hammer documents the demonstration and, in so doing, makes her own contribution to the national dialogue of post–September 11.

Browse Other Series from this Season
Return to Top
Harvard Film Archive • Carpenter Center • 24 Quincy Street • Cambridge MA 02138 • 617-495-4700