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May 31 - June 30, 2002

GLOBAL VISIONS
Undercurrents: Neglected Works from the French New Wave

The French New Wave (“la Nouvelle Vague”) was less a cohesive movement than a journalistic term of convenience coined to embrace the sudden appearance on many fronts of new and stylistically innovative films by young directors. The great critical and commercial success during the watershed years 1959 and 1960 of such still-revered films as The Four Hundred Blows and Shoot the Piano Player (Truffaut), Hiroshima mon amour (Resnais), Breathless (Jean-Luc Godard), Les Cousins (Chabrol), Cléo from 5 to 7 (Varda), and Lola (Demy) gave producers the necessary encouragement to finance the work of young filmmakers throughout the country—a trend that soon would spread elsewhere. In 1959, twenty-four directors made their first feature films in France; a year later forty-three more filmmakers were able to launch their first projects; and by 1961 more than one hundred first films received financing. This period remains one of the most fertile in the history of film, spawning the production of works of wildly differing approaches—full of cinematic impertinence, playfulness, emotion, and personal conviction. While certain films of the period are regularly revived, many other accomplished works have fallen by the wayside, often simply because of the vagaries of distribution. This series is a modest attempt to showcase a few of the many examples from the rich variety of cinematic practice brought forth in the wake of the New Wave. 

For their invaluable support in helping to organize this program, we thank the Consulate of France in Boston, Eric Jausseran and Frédéric Martel, and the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs.


May 31 (Friday) 7 pm
June 3 (Monday) 9:15 pm

Paris Belongs to Us (Paris nous appartient)

Directed by Jacques Rivette
France 1960, 35mm, b/w, 140 min.
With Betty Schneider, Gianni Esposito, Françoise Prévost
French with English subtitles

Set in a near-deserted Paris in summer, Paris Belongs to Us—the first feature by Cahiers du cinéma critic Jacques Rivette, made with a camera borrowed from Claude Chabrol and shot on film stock bought by Truffaut—follows a group of enthusiastic young theatrical amateurs who come together to present a production of Shakespeare’s Pericles. Little by little, sexual and political tensions develop within the group. As misfortunes begin to befall them, the actors become haunted by a vague, unseen menace with increasingly conspiratorial undertones that suggest the state of the contemporary world. Poetic in its vision and realist in its expression, it remains one of the key works of the early Nouvelle Vague.

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June 1 (Saturday) 7 pm
June 7 (Friday) 9:15 pm

Le Beau Serge

Directed by Claude Chabrol
France 1958, 16mm, b/w, 97 min.
With Jean-Claude Brialy, Gérard Blain, Bernadette Lafont
French with English subtitles

Surprisingly little known for a film widely regarded as the first of the Nouvelle Vague, Le Beau Serge was the debut feature of 28-year-old critic Claude Chabrol. A theology student, suffering from tuberculosis, returns to his native village to discover that his talented childhood friend Serge has become a hopeless drunk, estranged from his pregnant wife. A deeply felt drama that explores male friendship and commitment, Le Beau Serge is rich in details of provincial life. It was shot entirely on location in the village of Sardent, where Chabrol spent much of his childhood.

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June 1 (Saturday) 9 pm
June 3 (Monday) 7 pm

Les Cousins

Directed by Claude Chabrol
France 1959, 35mm, b/w, 110 min.
With Jean-Claude Brialy, Gérard Blain, Juliette Mayniel
French with English subtitles

Chabrol’s exciting, stylish, and complex film has added value as a fascinating excursion into Parisian student life of the 1950s. In many respects the narrative converse of the director’s previous film, Le Beau Serge, and featuring the same lead actors, Les Cousins is the story of a student from the provinces who comes to Paris to live with his sophisticated, bullying cousin. Inevitably their rivalry leads them to compete for the love of the same woman. A major commercial success for its grim, clear-eyed look at the cynicism of youth, Les Cousins earned the Best Film Award at the 1959 Berlin Film Festival.

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June 2 (Sunday) 7:30 pm
June 5 (Wednesday) 9 pm

Adieu Philippine

Directed by Jacques Rozier
France 1961/63, 35mm, b/w, 106 min.
With Jean-Claude Aimini, Yveline Céry, Stefania Sabatini
French with English subtitles

An ode to the insouciance of youth, Adieu Philippine was director Jacques Rozier’s first feature film and, arguably, the work that most vividly captures the essence of the French New Wave. Using improvisation, amateur performers, hidden microphones, and cameras in real locations, the film possesses a rough spontaneity that conforms as much to the aesthetics of cinéma verité as to those of the Nouvelle Vague. In his last few months before military service, Michel, a young TV technician on holiday, befriends two aspiring actresses, Liliane and Juliette. The trio shares a holiday in Corsica as a prelude to Michel’s probable deployment to the war in Algeria. At the time of its release, Jean-Luc Godard called Adieu Philippine “quite simply the best French film of these last years.” Disputes with the producer, delays in its release, and its failure at the box office prevented Rozier from making another film for ten years.

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June 5 (Wednesday) 7 pm
June 19 (Wednesday) 9 pm

Les Mistons (The Brats)

Directed by François Truffaut
France 1957, 35mm, b/w, 23 min.
With Bernadette Lafont, Gérard Blain
French with English subtitles

During their summer holidays in the French town of Nîmes, a group of mischievous schoolboys has fun at the expense of two lovers, Gérard and Bernadette—a harmless tomfoolery that ends in tragedy.

Brigitte et Brigette

Directed by Luc Moullet
France 1966, 35mm, color, 75 min.
With Françoise Vatel, Colette Descombes, Claude Melki
French with English subtitles

Director Jean-Marie Straub has called Luc Moullet “undoubtedly the only heir to both Buñuel and Tati.” A complete film athlete, Moullet has worn several hats with ease: those of critic (for Cahiers du cinéma since 1956), essayist, actor, producer (notably for Marguerite Duras’s 1972 Nathalie Granger), and director of more than two dozen films. After presenting a twenty-minute documentary about the two smallest villages in France, Moullet’s first feature shifts to Paris in the 1960s, where two girls from the two villages, each named Brigitte, share an apartment and study at the Sorbonne—not, however, without encountering difficulties. Rarely shown in this country, Brigitte et Brigitte has been compared in spirit to the work of the French Situationists and includes cameos by directors Eric Rohmer, Claude Chabrol, and Sam Fuller.

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June 6 (Thursday) 7 pm
June 15 (Saturday) 9 pm

Maine-Ocean Express

Directed by Jacques Rozier
France 1985, 35mm, color, 131 min.
With Bernard Menez, Luis Rego, Yves Alonso

Jacques Rozier’s return to features after yet another long absence was the deserving winner of France’s Jean Vigo prize. Displaying Rozier’s usual improvisatory brio, Maine-Océan Express exudes an insatiable curiosity about what happens when people of different languages and cultures are thrown together. Beginning with a beautiful black samba dancer’s breathless dash to catch a train from Paris to the Atlantic Coast, the film introduces us in no time to a pair of conductors who discover that you can’t always play by the rules, a feisty woman attorney with a passion for semiotics, an unforgettable sailor with an hilariously impenetrable Breton accent (Yves Alonso playing Michel Simon playing Popeye), and an incredibly temperamental Mexican impresario.

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Free screenings
June 7 (Friday) 7 pm
June 12 (Wednesday) 9 pm

Web of Passion (À Double Tour)

Directed by Claude Chabrol
France 1959, 35mm, color, 110 min.
With Bernadette Lafont, Jacques Dacqmine, Jean-Paul Belmondo
French with English subtitles

Through a fascinatingly labyrinthine narrative, filled with flashbacks, Claude Chabrol explores the impact on a bourgeois family of two outsiders: a beautiful and mysterious neighbor called Léda (Antonella Lualdi) and an uncouth Hungarian named Laszlo (Belmondo, who had just played a Hungarian named Laszlo in Godard’s Breathless). The story, adapted by screenwriter Paul Gégauff from The Key to Nicholas Street by noted mystery novelist Stanley Ellin, involves an oedipal sexual triangle and murder—the basic components of many Chabrol movies to come. His first thriller and his first work in color, Web of Passion boasts virtuoso camerawork by cinematographer Henri Decae.

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June 8 (Saturday) 7 pm
June 13 (Thursday) 7 pm

L'amour Fou

Directed by Jacques Rivette
France 1968, 16mm, b/w, 252 min.
With Bulle Ogier, Jean-Pierre Kalfon, Michèle Moretti
French with English subtitles

This legendary four-hour masterpiece is the film that solidified Jacques Rivette’s reputation as a major innovator in French cinema. A study of disintegrating personal relationships, L’Amour Fou focuses on a theater group preparing to stage Racine’s Andromaque while being filmed by a television crew. During the rehearsal, the play’s director replaces his wife in the lead with his former mistress. The film, shot in both 16mm and 35mm, was developed from ideas of the cast and technicians and improvised during filming. Its extreme length is integral to its meaning and texture, which critic James Monaco has compared to the musical form of Indian tals—“long, enormously complex rhythmic structures of as much as thirty-two beats.”

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June 11 (Tuesday) 7 pm
June 14 (Friday) 9 pm

Le Petit Soldat

Directed by Jean-Luc Godard
France 1961/63, 35mm, b/w, 88 min.
With Michel Subor, Anna Karina
French with English subtitles

Godard’s second feature—shot just months after the release of his highly successful debut film, Breathless—was immediately banned in France for its razor-sharp reflection on the Algerian war in a politically divided nation. In Le Petit Soldat Godard utilizes the thriller format to frame the story of a confused man in a complex situation. A French agent working in Geneva during the waning era of the Franco-Algerian struggle, Bruno Forestier maintains an indifferent politics and obsessive self-examination that lead him to a romantic involvement with Algerian agent Veronica Dreyer (Anna Karina in her first role for the director). The film’s depiction of the brutality and torture used by both sides in this bloody war infuriated both the Left and the Right.

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June 11 (Tuesday) 8:45 pm
June 25 (Tuesday) 7 pm

Le Gai Savoir

Directed by Jean-Luc Godard
France 1968, 16mm, color, 95 min.
With Jean-Pierre Léaud, Juliet Berto
French with English subtitles

Originally commissioned as a modern version of Rousseau’s Emile for French television, which subsequently refused to air it, Le Gai savoir is an investigation into the nature of language and image. Godard’s multi-level exploration employing two symbolic characters—Patricia, a daughter of Lumumba and the Cultural Revolution, and Emile, great-great-grandson of Jean-Jacques Rousseau—takes place in the metaphorical void of a deserted television studio at night. The two agree that they must go back to the degree zero of cinema, dissolving its sounds and images to find its structure. Only then, after a fresh start, can the media bring about revolutionary social relations. It is a compelling experiment that foreshadows the use of imagery in Godard’s later films and explicates the very building blocks of cinema.

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June 14 (Friday) 7 pm
June 19 (Wednesday) 7 pm

The Sign of Leo (Le Signe du lion)

Directed by Eric Rohmer
France 1959, 16mm, b/w, 102 min.
With Jess Hahn, Van Doude, Michèle Girardon
French with English subtitles

Eric Rohmer was the editor of the influential Cahiers du cinéma when he made this first full-length feature, a perceptive portrait of a good-natured but hopelessly irresponsible American composer living on the Left Bank in Paris. Assuming that he has inherited a fortune from his recently deceased aunt, he borrows money to hold a party—only to learn that the news is false and that he has lost everything. The film is notable for its detailed and vivid evocation of a Paris transformed by summer heat, American tourists, and the composer’s suddenly marginal position—all brilliantly captured by Nicholas Hayer’s camera. A seminal work of the New Wave and Fassbinder’s favorite film, The Sign of Leo is a powerful study of contemporary isolation.

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June 16 (Sunday) 7:30 pm
June 20 (Thursday) 7 pm

Secret Defense

Directed by Jacques Rivette
France 1997, 35mm, color, 170 min.
With Sandrine Bonnaire, Jerzy Radziwilowicz, Grégoire Colin
French with English subtitles 

Jacques Rivette has contijued to reinvent and extend the medium in such recent films as Va Sovoir (2001) and Haut, Bas, Fragile (1995).  Between these two films is the lesser known Secret Défense, an icy murder thriller and contemporary version of the Electra myth.  In a performance of considerable intensity, Sandrine Bonnaire stars as a research scientist who seeks revenge on the industrialist she believes has killed her father.  The taut psychological suspense is heightened as the twists and turns of plot are echoed in a constant maze of trains. bicycles, and pedestrians.  But it is in the interstices between actions-spaces which often hold the utmost fascination for Rivette-that Secret Défense tells its real story.

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June 15 (Saturday) 7 pm
June 21 (Friday) 7 pm

All Boys are Called Patrick (Tous les garçons s’appellent Patrick)

Directed by Jean-Luc Godard
France 1957, 16mm, b/w, 21 min.
With Jean-Claude Brialy, Nicole Berger, Anne Collette
French with English subtitles

One of Godard’s earliest films, this whimsical short follows two students, Véronique and Charlotte, who share a room together in Paris. They separately encounter a roguish young man named Patrick, who invites each of them on a date. Based on a scenario by Eric Rohmer, the film encapsulates the fickle folly of adolescent love in and around the chic Left Bank of Paris.

Anotione et Colette

Directed by François Truffaut
France 1962, 35mm, color, 29 min.
With Jean-Pierre Léaud, Marie-France Pisier, François Darbon
French with English subtitles

Made for the omnibus film Love at Twenty (with episodes by directors Andrzej Wajda, Sintaro Ishihara, Marcel Ophuls, and Renzo Rossellini), this short work was Truffaut’s first attempt to re-use the character of Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud) he created for his earlier, semi-autobiographical film The Four Hundred Blows. Now age seventeen, Antoine works in a record factory. At a music concert he meets Colette, a girl his own age, falls in love with her, and decides to move into a hotel opposite her home in hopes of winning her heart. This rueful little film, told with all Truffaut’s usual insight into the quirks of human behavior, captures the hesitancies and uncertainties of young love.

La Nouvelle Vague Par Elle-Meme (The New Wave by the New Wave)

Directed by Robert Valey
France 1964, video, b/w, 55 min.
French with English subtitles

Made for the omnibus film Love at Twenty (with episodes by directors Andrzej Wajda, Sintaro Ishihara, Marcel Ophuls, and Renzo Rossellini), this short work was Truffaut’s first attempt to re-use the character of Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud) he created for his earlier, semi-autobiographical film The Four Hundred Blows. Now age seventeen, Antoine works in a record factory. At a music concert he meets Colette, a girl his own age, falls in love with her, and decides to move into a hotel opposite her home in hopes of winning her heart. This rueful little film, told with all Truffaut’s usual insight into the quirks of human behavior, captures the hesitancies and uncertainties of young love.

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June 17 (Monday) 7 pm
June 18 (Tuesday) 8:30 pm

L'Immortelle

Directed by Alain Robbe-Grillet
France/Italy/Turkey 1963, 16mm, b/w, 100 min.
With Françoise Brion, Jacques Doinol-Valcroze, Guido Celano
French with English subtitles

In Istanbul, a French lecturer meets a mysterious woman, also a foreigner, who shows him around the city and then abruptly vanishes. Nouveau roman writer Robbe-Grillet’s screenplay for Last Year at Marienbad a year earlier revealed a preoccupation with the image of the labyrinth. In his first film as director, the foreign city is a labyrinth in which the unnamed hero is lost linguistically, culturally, geographically, and emotionally. The Turkish music, the threatening dogs, the incomprehensible language, and the shrieking sirens create a sense of alienation—an “Orient seen from Paris, a picture-postcard Orient,” as Robbe-Grillet himself described it, in which an intriguing play on exotic and erotic stereotypes and the real and the imaginary (the woman may only exist in the man’s mind) suggests the nature of being uprooted.

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June 17 (Monday) 8:45 pm
June 24 (Monday) 9 pm

The Man Who Lies (L’homme qui ment)

Directed by Alain Robbe-Grillet
France/Czechoslovakia 1968, 35mm, b/w, 95 min.
With Jean-Louis Trintignant, Sylvie Breal, Dominique Prado
French with English subtitles

Jean-Louis Trintignant received the Best Actor award at the Berlin Film Festival for his performance in The Man Who Lies. A stranger who claims to be a member of the wartime underground but may have been a fascist arrives in a town. He constantly re-invents his identity in order to gain entrance—and acceptance—into a household of three beautiful women whose son, brother, and lover have perhaps never returned from the war. A filmic jigsaw puzzle that enlists the spectator’s imagination in assembling the fragments supplied by Robbe-Grillet, The Man Who Lies also provides its own “solution” at the end. 

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June 18 (Tuesday) 7 pm
June 26 (Wednesday) 9 pm

A Simple Story (Une simple histoire)

Directed by Marcel Hanoun
France 1958, 16mm, b/w, 68 min.
With Micheline Bezançon, Elisabeth Huart
French with English subtitles

Considered one of the great “lost” films and a precursor of the French New Wave, Tunisian-born director Marcel Hanoun’s first film, Une simple histoire, was co-produced by French television on a very low budget and shot in 16mm. Inspired by an item on the back page of a newspaper, the spare “plot” concerns a woman who arrives in Paris with her little girl to seek work. A series of peregrinations leave her penniless, homeless, and ultimately dependent on the kindness of strangers. The film is notable for its rigorous construction and for the intricate relationship between its first-person, voice-over commentary and the images and dialogue they comment on—subject of a famous exegesis by film theorist Noël Burch and the reason for his labeling it “one of the few genuine masterpieces in the entire history of cinema.”

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June 21 (Friday) 9 pm
June 23 (Sunday) 7:30 pm

Les Carabiniers (The Riflemen)

Directed by Jean-Luc Godard
France /Italy 1963, 35mm, b/w, 80 min.
With Marino Masé, Albert Juross, Catherine Ribeiro
French with English subtitles

Godard’s fifth feature film, Les Carabiniers follows the picaresque journeys of Ulysses and Michelangelo, two peasants who must leave wives and homes to fight for the king in an unspecified time and place. Lured by promises of “all the riches of the world,” the pair travels to exotic locales, whose conquests are documented by series of picture-postcards sent back to their wives. Godard’s fable takes a dark turn when a treaty signed by the king transforms the returning victors into war criminals. Shooting in the grainy black and white of old newsreels, with footage of real wars appended to images of rape, pillage, tourism, and luxe consumer goods, Godard created a powerful (and in its time, controversial) statement against war, imperialism, and capitalist society.

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June 22 (Saturday) 7 pm
June 26 (Wednesday) 7 pm

Zazie Dans Le Metro

Directed by Louis Malle
France 1960, 35mm, color, 88 min.
With Catherine Demongeot, Philippe Noiret, Carla Marlier
French with English subtitles

Precocious, foul-mouthed preteen Zazie spends 36 hours with her female-impersonator uncle in Paris with the sole intention of going for a ride on the Métro—but everything seems to conspire against her goal. Zazie dans le Métro was Louis Malle’s brave attempt to find visual equivalents to the eccentric, jazzy syntax of Raymond Queneau’s novel through a wide array of cinematic devices: sight gags, trick shots, superimposition, slow motion, accelerated motion, and intertextual references. The surreal view of Paris in bright colors gives much pleasure, as does Catherine Demongeot’s sparkling performance as Zazie.

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June 22 (Saturday) 8:45 pm
June 24 (Monday) 7 pm

Fahrenheit 451

Directed by François Truffaut
UK 1967, 35mm, color, 111 min.
With Oskar Werner, Julie Christie, Cyril Cusack

Fahrenheit 451 remains one of Truffaut’s most underrated and misunderstood films, perhaps because it is less science fiction than fairy tale. Where Ray Bradbury’s novel posited a strange, terrifyingly mechanized society that banned books in the interest of material well-being, Truffaut presents a cozy world not so very different from our own, with television a universal father figure that pours out reassuring messages and the only element of menace a fire-engine tearing down the road. This was Truffaut’s first color film, with cool, crisp cinematography by future director Nicholas Roeg and a memorable score by the great Bernard Hermann. A restrained and elegiac film, Fahrenheit 451 has become more fascinating with time.

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June 25 (Tuesday) 9 pm
June 29 (Saturday) 9:15 pm

The Smugglers (Les Contrebandières)

Directed by Luc Moullet
France 1967, 35mm, b/w, 81 min.
With Françoise Vatel, Monique Thiriet, Johnny Montheilhet
French with English subtitles

One of Cahiers du cinéma’s most brilliantly idiosyncratic writers during the 1950s and 60s (and again, for a time, in the 1980s and 90s), Luc Moullet is possessed of an equally unique directorial sensibility. The private and comic registers of both his fiction and nonfiction films have made them highly resistant to easy description and popular success. Among the best is The Smugglers, a defiantly amateurish non-adventure adventure film concerning three people off in the wilds with no skills whatsoever, made in advance of May ’68. In its terminally digressive, aggressively slapsticky way, the film manages to encapsulate an entire era. Called by Jean-Marie Straub “maybe the best film not made by Godard” and by Moullet himself as “the best film of Robbe-Grillet,” this movie about borders and barriers sports a cameo appearance by the director, who is listed in the credits as “pompous fool.”

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June 27 (Thursday) 7 pm
June 30 (Sunday) 7:30 pm

The Long Absence (Une aussi longue absence)

Directed by Henri Colpi
France/Italy 1960, 16mm, b/w, 96 min.
With Alida Valli, Georges Wilson, Jacques Harden
French with English subtitles

Winner of the Grand Prize at the 1961 Cannes Film Festival, The Long Absence, based on a screenplay by Marguerite Duras and Gérard Jarlot, is the seldom-seen first feature by masterful film editor Henri Colpi, responsible for the editing of such classic films as The Picasso Mystery, Hiroshima mon amour, and Last Year at Marienbad. Set in a village on the outskirts of Paris, it is the story of a café owner who meets an amnesiac tramp and becomes convinced that he is her missing husband, who disappeared fifteen years earlier in a prison camp. Poetic, poignant, and beautifully underplayed, Colpi’s simple story is a powerful exploration of the themes of memory and identity. 

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June 27 (Thursday) 9 pm
June 28 (Friday) 7 pm

Paris Vu Par. . . (Six in Paris)

Directed by Claude Chabrol, Jean Douchet, Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Daniel Pollet, Jean Rouch, Eric Rohmer
France 1965, 16mm, color, 95 min.
With Stéphane Audran, Claude Melki, Joanna Shimkus
French with English subtitles

This entertaining anthology is comprised of six vignettes directed by six directors of the French New Wave, with each episode situated in a different section of Paris. Saint Germain des Prés (Douchet), Gare du Nord (Rouch), Rue St. Denis (Pollet), and Montparnasse et Levallois (Godard) are stories of love, flirtation, and prostitution; Place d’Etoile (Rohmer) concerns a haberdasher and his umbrella; while La Muette (Chabrol) revolves around a bourgeois family and earplugs. Together, they form a delicious smorgasbord of short offerings that pay tribute to the city that inspired the New Wave generation.

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June 28 (Friday) 9 pm
June 29 (Saturday) 7 pm

The Soft Skin (La Peau douce)

Directed by François Truffaut
France/Portugal 1964, 35mm, b/w, 118 min.
With Jean Desailly, Françoise Dorléac, Nelly Benedetti
French with English subtitles

Made in reaction to the triumph of Jules and Jim (1961), Truffaut’s fourth feature surprised many of his admirers. Again employing a love triangle as the basis for his story, this time the director addressed what he called “a truly modern love; it takes place in planes, elevators, it has all the harassments of modern life.” Drawing his screenplay from several news items, Truffaut recounts the story of an adulterous affair between a middle-aged literary critic and a stewardess he meets on a plane to Portugal. In between Jules and Jim and The Soft Skin, Truffaut had been preparing his book on Hitchcock, and the lessons of the master are evident in the rigor of the direction here—especially in the irony that portrays the hero’s mistress as a cool, teasingly uninvolved blonde while all the passion lurks in the dark wife’s libido.

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