Papers of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Working Group I Fourth Assessment Report
Review Comments and Responses

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This collection contains the drafts, expert and government review comments, and author responses used to prepare Climate Change 2007 - The Physical Science Basis, the contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.


About the IPCC

The United Nations Environment Programme and the World Meteorological Organization set up the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 1988 “to provide an authoritative international statement of scientific understanding of climate change.”   The IPCC issues “periodic assessments of the causes, impacts and possible response strategies to climate change,” neutral assessments that form the basis for international negotiations on climate change. As with previous IPCC assessments, the Fourth Assessment, published in 2007, drew on the expertise of hundreds of authors divided into three working groups, each with its own major component of the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4):

Working Group I: The Physical Science Basis Full Report
Summary for Policymakers
Working Group II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability Full Report
Summary for Policymakers
Working Group III: Mitigation of Climate Change Full Report Summary for Policymakers

The insights of the three working groups are also combined into a single volume:
Synthesis Report Full Report Summary for Policymakers

The three previous assessment reports of the IPCC were published in 1990, 1995, and 2001.

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Browse the Collection

These documents that were used to prepare Climate Change 2007 - The Physical Science Basis are searched as a whole by "Search the Collection" above.

First Order Draft [August 15, 2005]
Contains text of all chapters
Second Order Draft [March 3, 2006]
Contains text of all chapters
Chapter 1: Historical Overview of Climate Change Science
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 1 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 1
Chapter 2: Changes in Atmospheric Constituents and in Radiative Forcing
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 2 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 2
Chapter 3: Observations: Surface and Atmospheric Climate Change
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 3 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 3
Chapter 4: Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 4 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 4
Chapter 5: Observations: Oceanic Climate Change and Sea Level
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 5 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 5
Chapter 6: Palaeoclimate
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 6 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 6
Chapter 7: Couplings Between Changes in the Climate System and Biogeochemistry
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 7 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 7
Chapter 8: Climate Models and their Evaluation
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 8 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 8
Chapter 9: Understanding and Attributing Climate Change
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 9 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 9
Chapter 10: Global Climate Projections
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 10 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 10
Chapter 11: Regional Climate Projections
Comments on the First-Order Draft Chapter 11 Comments on the Second-Order Draft Chapter 11

Government/Expert Review - Summary for Policymakers [Draft of SFP, April 4, 2006]
Expert and Government Review Comments on the Second-Order Draft - Summary for Policymakers Comments with Responses

Government/Expert Review - Technical Summary [Draft of TS, April 5, 2006]
Expert and Government Review Comments on the Second-Order Draft - Technical Summary Comments

Final Draft Summary for Policymakers [October 27, 2006]
Government Comments on the Final Draft of the SPM

Author List
Chapter List

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Research Assistance

Environmental Research Librarian George E. Clark is available for research assistance via e-mail

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